Assess your Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Risk

This post is for those who have not yet been diagnosed with diabetes–so you may be pre-diabetic, or have been told that your sugars are a little high.  Maybe your sugar levels are fine, but you want to check in with your health and see whether you are at risk of developing diabetes.  Maybe you are concerned about a friend or a family member and their risk for developing diabetes (especially if there is a family history).  Whatever the case, there is a handy website to visit that will help you to assess your risk of developing pre-diabetes and/or diabetes in your lifetime.

Go to this website and complete the CANRISK test (see the green box):

Don’t Be Risky

Completing the survey can help you to know if you are at risk for developing diabetes.  This knowledge can help you consider making lifestyle changes that can make you happier and healthier for longer–for example, eating more vegetables, reducing your portion sizes, quitting smoking or moving your body more.  Did you know that a 5% reduction in your weight can reduce the risk of progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes by 60% (1)–that’s huge!  Keep in mind, that for someone who weighs 200 lbs, a 5% weight loss means losing 10lbs.  This does not need to be done in the next month as even a gradual reduction over a year will pay off with big health benefits!  To help make this happen, you could skip the can of regular pop in the day, reduce the amount of cream and sugar used in your coffee, skip an evening snack if you’re not actually hungry!

The more we know about our health, our bodies and healthy behaviours, the more power we have to change our lives.  Take the test!  Send it to your loved ones!  If you have any questions about the test or the results, or if you want help with making lifestyle changes, talk to your healthcare provider or your diabetes team–support can make all the difference!

Andrea

 

References:

1. Ransom T, Goldenberg R, Mikalachki A et al.  Reducing the Risk of Developing Diabetes.  Can J Diabetes:2013; 37 (suppl 1): S16-S19.

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